2003 Madingley

2003: Tenth Anniversary Conference, Madingley Hall, Cambridge
 
BrANCH celebrated its tenth anniversary by holding a special conference at Madingley Hall, to which it invited members of SHEAR, the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
The conference had some special features: the first Peter Parish Memorial Lecture, a gala reception and celebratory banquet, and a used-book sale, with proceeds going to the Parish Fund. The programme had two main (and overlapping) themes, namely:
• New Perspectives on the Early Republic
• Slavery and the Old South
Eighty-five people attended, of whom about forty came from the United States. A dozen or so graduate students attended from both sides of the Atlantic. We were delighted to welcome as our guest at the anniversary banquet Mr Daniel Sreebny, the Minister Counsellor for Public Affairs at the United States Embassy.
BrANCH wishes to express its gratitude for financial support to the British Academy, the Mellon Professorial Fund of the University of Cambridge, and the Cultural Office of the United States Embassy.
Programme
 
Friday
OPENING LECTURE:
Chair: Donald Ratcliffe (BrANCH Chair)
Catherine E. Kelly (University of Oklahoma): “ Seeing Is Becoming: A Family of Women Miniaturists in the Early Republic.”
Saturday
1. GENDER ROLES in the EARLY REPUBLIC
Chair: Julie Roy Jeffrey (Goucher College)
Laura McCall (Metropolitan State College of Denver): ” Constructing Masculinity and Femininity.”
Panel: Christopher Clark (University of Warwick), Catherine E. Kelly (University of Oklahoma):
2. CONCEPTUALIZING SLAVERY
Chair: John Boles (Rice University)
Michael Tadman (University of Liverpool): “ Beyond the Web of Paternalism: Owners, ‘Key Slaves,’ and the Community of the Enslaved.”
William Dusinberre (University of Warwick): ” Capitalism, Paternalism, and Dissidence”
Commentator: Richard Follett (University of Sussex)
Parallel Sessions:
3. SELF-PERCEPTIONS IN THE OLD SOUTH
Chair and Commentator: William Rorabaugh (University of Washington)
Jennifer Goloboy (Harvard University): ” Woman’s Role in a Southern Mercantile Family”.
Brenda Thompson Schoolfield (University of South Carolina): “Knowing Time(s): Towards an Understanding of Age-Consciousness Among American Slaves.”
Michael S. Reynolds (University of South Carolina): “The Culture of Gambling in the Antebellum South.”
4. ANGLO-AMERICAN PERSPECTIVES
Chair: James C. Bradford (Texas A&M University)
Bruce Collins (Sheffield Hallam University): “American and British Military Cultures, 1789-1830”
Howard Temperley (University of East Anglia): “Slave Republic versus Abolitionist Empire: The Struggle over the Suppression of the Slave Trade, 1807-1867.”
Commentator: Brian Holden Reid (King’s College London)
5.30pm Gala Reception
 
5. PETER PARISH MEMORIAL LECTURE
Chair: Richard Carwardine (University of Oxford)
James McPherson (Princeton University): “No Peace Without Victory, 1861-1865.”
6. AFTER-DINNER ADDRESS:
Chair: William Brock (University of Cambridge)
Charles Joyner (Coastal Carolina University): ” Slavery and the Creolization of Southern Culture.”
Sunday
7. THE FIRST DEMOCRACY, 1789-1820
Chair: Donald Ratcliffe (University of Durham)
Jeffrey L. Pasley (University of Missouri): “Jeffersonian Democracy as a Social Movement.”
Philip Lampi (American Antiquarian Society): “The Reaction to the Embargo and the Federalist Revival, 1808-16.”
Andrew Robertson (City University of New York ): “The First Party System: New Reflections on ‘Deferential-Participants’.”
Commentator: William G. Shade (Lehigh University)
Parallel Sessions:
8. BLACK HEROES IN NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICA
Chair: Richard Blackett (Vanderbilt University)
Mitch Kachun (Western Michigan University): “The Construction of Crispus Attucks.”
Roy E. Finkenbine (University of Detroit Mercy): “Toussaint Louverture and Placido, 1840-60.”
Commentator: Andrew Kaye (University of Durham)
9. SLAVERY AND THE CONSTITUTION
Chair:
Michael Taylor (Dickinson State University): “Prigg v. Pennsylvania and the Constitutional Protection of Slavery.”
Peter Wallenstein (Virginia Polytechnic): “Slavery and Representation, From the Hartford Convention to the Fourteenth Amendment”
Commentator: Jack Pole (University of Oxford)
Parallel sessions:
10. THE ANTEBELLUM SOUTH AND THE EUROPEAN CONNECTION
Chair: Betty Wood (University of Cambridge)
Sam Haynes (University of Texas at Arlington): “Anglophobia and the Nullification Crisis”
Sarah Purcell (Grinnell College): “Texas and European Romanticism in the Work of Mary Austin Holley”
Commentator: Michael O’Brien (University of Cambridge).
11. CIVIL WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH
Chair and Commentator: Susan-Mary Grant (University of Newcastle)
Jacqueline G. Campbell (University of Connecticut): “Mothers and Warriors: Confederate Women and Union Soldiers.”
David Deverick (University of Nottingham): “Popular Perceptions of U.S. Grant during and after the Civil War.”
Robert C. Kenzer (Richmond): “A Virginia Civil War Widow Faces the Postwar South”.
12. ANTEBELLUM AMERICANS AND THE ISLAMIC WORLD
Chair: Ruth Crocker (Auburn University):
Tim Roberts (Bilkent University): “American Impressions of the Ottoman Empire, 1815-1860.”
Donald Ratcliffe (University of Durham): “Selling Captain Riley: North African Slavery and American Readers.”
Commentator: Daniel Walker Howe (University of Oxford and UCLA)